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the #1 hit records on the pop charts 1969

THIS IS THE TENTH in a series of ten articles listing and addressing the #1 records of the year as they appeared on Cash Box magazine’s Top 100 chart from 1960 through 1969. It was originally published as “Someday We’ll Be Honky Tonk Women Together” on my publication Tell It Like It Was on Medium on October 1, 2019. [Read more] “the #1 hit records on the pop charts 1969”

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the #1 hit records on the pop charts 1968

THIS IS THE NINTH in a series of ten articles listing and addressing the #1 records of the year as they appeared on Cash Box magazine’s Top 100 chart from 1960 through 1969. It was originally published as “Grazing In The Grass With Mrs. Robinson” on my publication Tell It Like It Was on Medium on September 19, 2019. [Read more] “the #1 hit records on the pop charts 1968”

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the #1 hit records on the pop charts 1967

THIS IS THE EIGHTH in a series of ten articles listing and addressing the #1 records of the year as they appeared on Cash Box magazine’s Top 100 chart from 1960 through 1969. It was originally published as “Hey, There Georgy Girl, Penny Lane, And Ruby Tuesday! [Read more] “the #1 hit records on the pop charts 1967”

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the #1 hit records on the pop charts 1966

THIS IS THE SEVENTH in a series of ten articles listing and addressing the #1 records of the year as they appeared on Cash Box magazine’s Top 100 chart from 1960 through 1969. It was originally published as “You Keep Me Hanging On The Poor Side Of Town” on my publication Tell It Like It Was on Medium on July 5, 2019. [Read more] “the #1 hit records on the pop charts 1966”

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why the hell isn’t gene clark in the hall of fame? (gene clark part 4)

ONCE UPON A TIME, it looked like the Byrds had a long, successful, productive career in front of them. In 1965, they had two #1 hits that effectively defined the recently coined term folk-rock. Their two albums were pivotal in the transition of rock music from being primarily pop singles-oriented to being primarily “serious” album-oriented. [Read more] “why the hell isn’t gene clark in the hall of fame? (gene clark part 4)”

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donovan knows a beach where it never ends

DONOVAN CAME ON FAST in 1965 with three Top 10 hits in the UK: “Catch the Wind,” “Colours,” and “The Universal Soldier.” None of these came close to duplicating that success in the US. That didn’t prevent many from labeling him a “Dylan imitator” for both his music and his adoption of working man’s clothing. [Read more] “donovan knows a beach where it never ends”

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getting back to roots and things (beatles ’68 part 4)

ONCE UPON A TIME IN 2013, I became aware of Mr. Rutherford Chang and his “We Buy White Albums” project. It seems Chang had been collecting used, neglected, and even abused copies of The Beatles (lovingly known by one and all as The White Album) and had turned his “collection” into an art presentation at a gallery in New York City. [Read more] “getting back to roots and things (beatles ’68 part 4)”

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unplugging the white album (beatles ’68 part 3)

WE’RE OFF TO SEE THE MAHARISHI, the wonderful Maharishi of Oz!” On February 16, 1968, John and Cynthia Lennon and George and Pattie Harrison arrived in Delhi, later joined by Ringo and Maureen Starr and Paul McCartney and longtime girlfriend Jane Asher. They were there for a prolonged stay at the Rishikesh ashram of the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi for special courses in Transcendental Meditation. [Read more] “unplugging the white album (beatles ’68 part 3)”

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in search of the lost mentor (beatles ’68 part 2)

MAHARISHI MAHESH YOGI played an important role in the Beatles career, one that has been shoved aside by fans and historians. If you were of age and paying attention in 1968, the Maharishi was the Big Poobah in the Fab Four’s lives, at least for a while. [Read more] “in search of the lost mentor (beatles ’68 part 2)”