the avid collectors’ guide to wild in the streets part 4

THIS IS PART 4 of the Avid Record Col­lec­tor’s Price Guide to Wild In The Streets. It ad­dresses in de­tail the four al­bums as­so­ci­ated with that movie and its music. The first three parts have been pub­lished, and with this part I fi­nally get around the a la­be­l­og­raphy and price guide for the records.

So, here are the most de­tailed list­ings that I could com­pile for the four al­bums as­so­ci­ated with the movie Wild In The Streets.

The records are listed chrono­log­i­cally by their cat­alog num­bers. I in­cluded il­lus­tra­tions of each record’s la­bels as best as I was able to hunt them down on the In­ternet.

Sev­eral key im­ages were pro­vided by Frank Daniels. The as­signed values are ex­plained in the pre­ceding post (Part 3.)

Wild In The Streets – Original Soundtrack 

WITS_Cover

East Coast Pressing

This ver­sion of Tower SKAO-5099 was man­u­fac­tured at Capitol’s plant in Scranton and may have been re­leased as early as May or as late as Sep­tember 1968. Five tracks on the record’s la­bels are cred­ited to Max Frost & The Troopers; there is NO men­tion of 13th Power on the la­bels.

 

WITS_EC_1st_NoK2_

WITS_misspell

Some first East Coast pressing la­bels (above) had an error in the printing: on the first line at the top, “Orig­inal Sound­trac” is mis­spelled without the ‘k’ at the end. These may be the le­git­i­mate first press­ings, and all sub­se­quent press­ings were cor­rected. But that is an as­sump­tion at this time.

 

WITS_EC_label

The record has plain or­ange la­bels with the smaller inner circle in­dented around the spindle hole. The print is in tall, thin let­ters. The title at the top is on two lines with the movie title in larger print:

WILD IN THE STREETS ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK
FROM THE AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL MOTION PICTURE

On the right side of the spindle hole is “STEREO / SKAO-5099 / (SKAO1-5099)” in upper case let­ters on three lines as:

STEREO
SKAO-5099
(SKAO1-5099)

There is a nu­meral 1 or 2 to the right of the second and third lines, just below the “O” in “STEREO.” At the bottom of the label is a state­ment in tiny upper case let­ters that reads:

MFD. IN U.S.A.

Tech­ni­cally, a per­fect East Coast album would have an East Coast pressing of the record housed in an East Coast jacket with a number 2 or 3 in the lower right corner of the back cover.

•  White label promos are not known to exist.
•  Stock copies have a sug­gested NM value of $15-20.
•  Des­ig­nated promos have a sug­gested NM value of $20-25.
•  Factory-sealed copies have a sug­gested NM value of $25-30.

 

WITS_Cover

West Coast Pressing

This ver­sion of 5099 was man­u­fac­tured at Capitol’s plant in Los An­geles and was re­leased no later than June 1968. The album sold well, reaching Billboard’s Top 20 on their LP survey. Five tracks on the record’s la­bels are cred­ited to 13th Power; there is NO men­tion of Max Frost & The Troopers on the la­bels or the jackets

 

WITS_WC_labl

The record has plain or­ange la­bels with the title in­for­ma­tion at the top in upper case let­ters (with the title in larger print) in dark, bold print on three lines as:

WILD IN THE STREETS
ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK
FROM THE AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL MOTION PICTURE

On the right side of the spindle hole is “STEREO / SKAO-5099” in upper case let­ters on two lines as:

STEREO
SKAO-5099

There is a nu­meral 1 or 2 to the right of the two lines. At the bottom of the label is a state­ment in tiny upper case let­ters that reads:

MANUFACTURED IN THE U.S.A. BY CAPITOL RECORDS, INC.

Tech­ni­cally, a per­fect West Coast album would have a West Coast pressing of the record housed in a West Coast jacket with a number 5, 6, or 8 in the lower right corner of the back cover.

•  White label promos of the West Coast record are not known to exist, even though Capitol was pressing them at this time for other Tower al­bums at the Los An­geles plant.
•  Stock copies have a sug­gested NM value of $15-20.
•  Des­ig­nated promos have a sug­gested NM value of $20-25.
•  Factory-sealed copies have a sug­gested NM value of $25-30. 1

Copies of both West Coast and East Coast al­bums can be found with a large sticker on the shrink-wrap that reads “in this album / 2 Hit Sin­gles / SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME / & / LISTEN TO THE MUSIC” on five lines af­fixed to the front cover.

 

WITS_sticker

As these sin­gles were ap­par­ently re­leased in Au­gust and Sep­tember—after the re­lease of the album—then al­bums with this sticker are tech­ni­cally later is­sues. Nonethe­less, these be-stickered al­bums are sought after by some col­lec­tors and have a sug­gested NM value of $20-25.

This album was is­sued in Canada as Capitol SKAO-6284, part of the highly col­lec­table Capitol 6000 se­ries. Orig­inal press­ings have glossy black la­bels with a rainbow color-band around the perimeter and have a sug­gested NM value of $20-30.

It was also man­u­fac­tured in Canada as Capitol ST-6284; these were strictly for ex­porting to the UK for sale there. Orig­inal press­ings have glossy black la­bels with a rainbow color-band around the perimeter and have a sug­gested NM value of $30-40. 2

Two first pressings?

There are sev­eral dif­fer­ences on the la­bels of East Coast records pressed in Scranton and those of the West Coast records pressed in Los An­geles that re­quire ad­dressing, as one of them is major. Here is the issue: Scranton records have la­bels that read “Mfd. In U.S.A” at the bottom, words as­so­ci­ated with Tower la­bels since 1964. Los An­geles la­bels have “Man­u­fac­tured in the U.S.A. by Capitol Records, Inc.” at the bottom, a new credit that would find its way onto all new Tower records be­gin­ning in Au­gust 1968.

 

The name Max Frost & The Troopers was ac­tu­ally res­ur­rected from an­other album re­leased ear­lier in the year, where it was also fake name!

 

So, one could as­sume that be­cause the Scranton records have older label stock, they were pressed be­fore the Los An­geles records, thereby making them the le­git­i­mate and only FIRST PRESSINGS of this title!

But the Scranton la­bels also credit five tracks to Max Frost & The Troopers, in­stead of 13th Power. Here is why that is an issue: the group 13th Power recorded their tracks for the sound­track as 13th Power. The orig­inal in­ten­tion of Side­walk Pro­duc­tions and Tower Records was not to credit the fic­tional and un­named band in the movie on the album. In fact, the name Max Frost & The Troopers was res­ur­rected from THE GLORY STOMPERS album, re­leased ear­lier in the year.

So, all album jackets and all Los An­geles record la­bels, which were ap­par­ently done prior to the Scranton records, credit 13th Power. So, one could as­sume that be­cause the Los An­geles records have orig­inal artist credits on the la­bels (that co­in­cide with all of the know jackets), they were pressed be­fore the Scranton records, thereby making them the le­git­i­mate and only FIRST PRESSINGS of this title!

Then I came upon this:

 

Allan_Frost_Shape_1

Allan_Frost_Shape_2

Allan_Frost_Shape_PS

Allan_Frost_Shape_PS2

Be­cause Shape Of Things To Come did not enter the na­tional sur­veys until the last week of Au­gust, many his­to­rians (my­self in­cluded) as­sumed that the single had been pulled from the album due to pop­ular re­quest. There­fore, the pro­mo­tional pic­ture sleeve pre­ceded the re­lease of the record to the public. Not so—the sleeve in­cludes a note on the back that reads in full (typos and in­con­sis­ten­cies in­cluded) as:

The movie “WILD IN THE STREETS” is a fan­tastic suc­cess. Breaking box of­fice records in major the­atres is a pro­ducers’ dream … and that’s what WILD IN THE STREETS is doing.

“THE SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME” from the Amer­ican In­ter­na­tional pic­ture “WILD IN THE STREETS” is be­coming one of the most re­quested cuts from the Tower sound­track album.

We are re-servicing this record, which was orig­i­nally re­leased the first week of May, be­cause of the many re­quests re­ceived from D. J.’s and pro­mo­tion people across the country.

In the glaring light of re­cent tragic events, “WILD IN THE STREETS” projects today’s prob­lems into tomorrow’s pos­si­bil­i­ties, and “THE SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME” is an ex­cel­lent ex­ample.

So, Shape Of Things To Come was orig­i­nally is­sued as a 45 in May 1968 in ad­vance of the LP by weeks. It failed to light the night on fire. Then, due to the suc­cess of the LP, it was rere­leased (“re-serviced”) in Au­gust 1968, and stock copies were shipped to radio sta­tions in a pic­ture sleeve.

The “re­cent tragic events” in the note could al­most cer­tainly refer to the as­sas­si­na­tions of Martin Luther King Jr. (April 4) and Robert Kennedy Jr. (June 5). The record and the sleeve were being re­ceived by many radio sta­tions just prior to the De­mo­c­ratic Na­tional Con­ven­tion in Chicago. The pic­tures sleeve has a Scarcity Index rating of 6 and a sug­gested NM value of $40-50.

 

Allan_Frost_Shape_Capitol

Shape Of Things To Come / Free Lovin’ was is­sued in Canada on the col­lec­table Capitol 70000 se­ries.

Allan_Frost_Shape_PS4

Allan_Frost_Shape_PS_German

For this re­lease, Max and the boys rated pic­ture sleeves from Capitol in two coun­tries: France (top) and West Ger­many (bottom). “Les Troupes De La Colere” trans­lates as “The Troops Of Color.”

As­suming this chronology is ac­cu­rate, then the East Coast/Scranton records for SKAO-5099 with the older la­bels but the newer artist credits are le­git­i­mate first press­ings.

The West Coast/Los An­geles records for SKAO-5099 with the newer la­bels but the older artist credits are le­git­i­mate first press­ings.

So, putting aside the pressing with the missing ‘K,’ the ques­tion then is: Are then any le­git­i­mate second press­ings of SKAO-5099 from ei­ther side of the con­ti­nent? @@

 

The Arrows Play Music From The Score Of The Motion Picture Wild In The Streets

ArrowsWITS.cover

East Coast Pressing

This ver­sion of Tower ST-5139 was man­u­fac­tured at Capitol’s plant in Scranton and was prob­ably re­leased in July or Au­gust 1968.

 

ArrowsWITS.EC

The record has plain or­ange la­bels with the smaller inner circle in­dented around the spindle hole. The print is in tall, thin let­ters. The title at the top is on two lines:

THE ARROWS PLAY MUSIC FROM THE SCORE
OF THE MOTION PICTURE “WILD IN THE STREETS”

The record has plain or­ange la­bels. On the right side of the spindle hole is “STEREO / ST-5139 / (ST1-5139)” in upper case let­ters on three lines as:

STEREO
ST-5139
(ST1-5139)

There is a nu­meral or 2 to the right of the second and third lines, just below the “O” in “STEREO.” At the bottom of the label is a manufacturer’s state­ment in tiny upper case let­ters that reads:

MFD. IN U.S.A.

Tech­ni­cally, a per­fect East Coast album would have an East Coast pressing of the record housed in an East Coast jacket with a number 2 or 3 in the lower right corner of the back cover.

•  White label promos are not known to exist.
•  Stock copies have a sug­gested NM value of $20-30.
•  Des­ig­nated promos have a sug­gested NM value of $25-35.
•  Factory-sealed copies have a sug­gested NM value of $30-40.

 

ArrowsWITS.cover

West Coast Pressing

This ver­sion of 5139 was man­u­fac­tured at Capitol’s plant in Los An­geles and was prob­ably re­leased in July or Au­gust 1968. This album sold so mea­gerly that it failed to even reach Billboard’s Top 200 LPs. Con­se­quently, it is the least common of the three re­leased ti­tles dis­cussed here. Alas, it is also the least sought after among col­lec­tors.

 

ArrowsWITS.WC

The record has plain or­ange la­bels with the title in­for­ma­tion at the top in upper case let­ters in dark, bold print on four lines as:

THE ARROWS
PLAY MUSIC FROM
THE SCORE OF THE MOTION PICTURE
“WILD IN THE STREETS”

On the right side of the spindle hole is “STEREO / SKAO-5139” in upper case let­ters on two lines as:

STEREO
SKAO-5139

There is a nu­meral 1 or 2 to the right of the two lines. At the bottom of the label is a manufacturer’s state­ment in tiny upper case let­ters that reads:

MANUFACTURED IN THE U.S.A. BY CAPITOL RECORDS, INC.

Tech­ni­cally, a per­fect West Coast album would have a West Coast pressing of the record housed in a West Coast jacket with a number 5, 6, or 8 in the lower right corner of the back cover.

•  White label promos have a sug­gested NM value of $40-50.
•  Stock copies have a sug­gested NM value of $20-30.
•  Des­ig­nated promos have a sug­gested NM value of $25-35.
•  Factory-sealed copies have a sug­gested NM value of $30-40.

This album was is­sued in Canada as Capitol ST-6296, part of the highly col­lec­table Capitol 6000 se­ries. Orig­inal press­ings have glossy black la­bels with a rainbow color-band around the perimeter and have a sug­gested NM value of $30-40.

“I can’t listen to The Ar­rows Per­form Music From The Mo­tion Pic­ture ‘Wild In The Streets’ at all—what a stupid mis­take. Once I got into the fuzz, that’s all I wanted to use and then I found my­self agreeing to do an album without it!” (Davie Allan3

 

WITS_SecondTime

Listen To The Music

Un­like so many other Side­walk artists listed on sound­track records, the Second Time was a real group from Costa Mesa, Cal­i­fornia. They hooked up with Mike Curb in 1967 and recorded some sides, two of which were re­leased as a single in early 1968 (Shadows / Magic Man, Side­walk 943). Two more were in­cluded in the Wild In The Streets sound­track, Listen To The Music and Sally Le Roy.

In an at­tempt to pull a second hit single from the sound­track album, Listen To The Music was backed with Psy­che­delic Senate by the Sen­a­tors and is­sued in mid-‘68 (Tower 434). In the movie, Listen To The Music is ‘per­formed’ (mimed) by Max Frost and his reg­ular band:

Ap­par­ently, Curb had sched­uled a Second Time album (Tower ST-5146) for re­lease after the movie’s sound­track album had been mar­keted. The album’s track line-up would have been the four pre­vi­ously re­leased tracks—Listen To The Music, Sally Le Roy, Shadows, and Magic Man—along with Changes In My Lady, John’s Song, Mem­o­ries, Mr. Duffy, Sail To You, Sugar And Ice, and Two-Faced Madonna.

While Tower 5146 is listed in discogra­phies and even some price guides, there is no ev­i­dence to cause the Avid Record Col­lector to be­lieve that it was man­u­fac­tured, let alone re­leased. There have been no reg­is­tered sales on Pop­sike, Col­lec­tors Frenzy, or Amazon; there are no of­fers of a copy for sale on the In­ternet. Nothing more is known about the group’s ses­sions.

 

The Second Time - Listen To The Music (wild in the streets 1968)

Shape Of Things To Come

This album cred­ited to Max Frost & The Troopers (Tower ST-5147) was re­viewed in the No­vember 2, 1968 issue of Bill­board. The re­viewer called it a “hot item” and pre­dicted that “this disk should follow the single to chart con­tention.” Such was not the case and the album is a modest col­lec­table today.

 

East Coast Pressing

This ver­sion of 5147 was man­u­fac­tured at Capitol’s plant in Scranton, and was prob­ably re­leased in Oc­tober 1968.

 

Frost_label_EC1

The record has plain or­ange la­bels with the smaller inner circle in­dented around the spindle hole. The print is in tall, thin let­ters. The title at the top is on two lines with the artist credit in larger print:

SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME
MAX FROST AND THE TROOPERS

On the right side of the spindle hole is “STEREO / ST-5147 / (ST1-5147)” in upper case let­ters on three lines as:

STEREO
ST-5147
(ST1-5147)

There is a nu­meral or 2 to the right of the second and third lines, just below the “O” in “STEREO.” At the bottom of the label is a manufacturer’s state­ment in tiny upper case let­ters that reads:

MFD. IN U.S.A.

Tech­ni­cally, a per­fect East Coast album would have an East Coast pressing of the record housed in an East Coast jacket with a number 2 or 3 in the lower right corner of the back cover.

•  White label promos of the East Coast record are not known to exist.
•  Stock copies have a sug­gested NM value of $25-35.
•  Des­ig­nated promos have a sug­gested NM value of $30-40.
•  Factory-sealed copies have a sug­gested NM value of $40-50.

 

West Coast Pressing

This ver­sion of 5147 was man­u­fac­tured at Capitol’s plant in Los An­geles.

 

Frost_WC?

The record has plain or­ange la­bels with the title in­for­ma­tion at the top in large, upper case let­ters (with the artist credit larger) in dark, bold print on two lines as:

SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME
MAX FROST AND THE TROOPERS

On the right side of the spindle hole is “STEREO / ST-5147” in upper case let­ters on two lines as:

STEREO
ST-5147

There is a nu­meral 1 or 2 to the right of the two lines. At the bottom of the label is a manufacturer’s state­ment in tiny upper case let­ters that reads:

MANUFACTURED IN THE U.S.A. BY CAPITOL RECORDS, INC.

Tech­ni­cally, a per­fect West Coast album would have a West Coast pressing of the record housed in a West Coast jacket with a number 5, 6, or 8 in the lower right corner of the back cover.

•  White label promos have a sug­gested NM value of $50-60.
•  Stock copies have a sug­gested NM value of $25-35.
•  Des­ig­nated promos have a sug­gested NM value of $30-40.
•  Factory-sealed copies have a sug­gested NM value of $40-50.

NOTES: Two tracks on this album—Shape Of Things To Come and Fifty Two Per­cent—are the same as those on the pre­vi­ously re­leased WILD IN THE STREETS sound­track album, there cred­ited to ei­ther 13th Power or Max Frost & The Troopers. An­other track, Cap­tain Hassel, is the same as that cred­ited to 13th Power on a pre­vi­ously re­leased single (Side­walk 927).

The rest of the tracks ap­pear to have been written and recorded by Paul Wi­bier and 13th Power, prob­ably with the as­sis­tance of Mike Curb’s ubiq­ui­tous studio mu­si­cians. (Thanks again to The Seth Man.)

This album was is­sued in Canada as Capitol ST-6303, part of the highly col­lec­table Capitol 6000 se­ries. Orig­inal Cana­dian press­ings have glossy black la­bels with a rainbow band of color around the perimeter. This pressing is in more de­mand than the US orig­inal with a NM value of $50-60.

For more on this album and this con­ver­sa­tion in gen­eral, refer to an ear­lier post ti­tled “the re­turn of max frost & the troopers” on this site.

 

Arrows ShapesOfThingsToCome PS dj 500

This is one tough pic­ture sleeve to add to your col­lec­tion, es­pe­cially if you want a near mint copy. This promo sleeve was a low-budget af­fair, made of low-quality, un­coated paper. Most copies of this sleeve are in VG con­di­tion and can still sell for an easy $100.

Some odds & some ends

In 1968, the un­der­ground radio phe­nom­enon was in full swing on FM radio sta­tions around the country, and LP tracks were being played in­stead of sin­gles. Album tracks get­ting a lot of play and a lot or re­quests did lead com­pa­nies to pull tracks from LPs and issue them as 45s.

I as­sume that 13th Pow­er’s recording of Shape Of Things To Come re­ceived such air-play and Tower sub­se­quently re­leased the track as a single and found them­selves with a rea­son­ably good-sized hit. I also as­sume that 13th Power not only was screwed out of fame but also for­tune.

When the powers-that-be at Sidewalk/Tower got it in their heads to throw a bone in Davie Al­lan’s di­rec­tion, they al­lowed him to overdub his lead guitar onto the pre­vi­ously recorded and re­leased tracks for the sound­track album.

“I wish I could say that [the Ar­rows] were Max Frost & The Troopers, but un­for­tu­nately, it’s just not true. I did play on the Wild In The Streets sound­track along with studio mu­si­cians known as the Hol­ly­wood Wrecking Crew, but none of us played on Shape Of Things To Come. A band was hired to do that one and it was kept a se­cret as to whom the mem­bers were!

The mix-up started when my in­stru­mental ver­sion was re­leased as the last Ar­rows single on the Tower Records label. All I did was play lead on that pre-recorded track, so everyone as­sumed that we and Max Frost were one and the same. I am on some of the Max Frost tracks, in­cluding the ones that ap­peared on The Glory Stom­pers sound­track.” (Davie Allan)

 

Frost_8track

The 8-track cas­sette tape had a huge im­pact on the sales of LPs in the late 1960s into the ’80s. But there are com­par­a­tively few col­lec­tors of the medium and there­fore com­par­a­tively few worth more than a few bucks as in­ter­esting ar­ti­facts of an in­ter­esting era.

And that’s not all, folks!

I am calling it quits with a pair of re­views by two people other than the Avid Record Col­lector. Each has an opinion about the music that con­flicts with the other. Mr. Bloody-Know-It-All (moi!) fol­lows with his input, after which I end the piece with a bon mot from the King of Fuzz him­self.

“Ei­ther you’ve al­ready seen Wild In The Streets or you re­ally should. It’s bizarre, sur­real, awful, and fantastic—all at the same time! As for the music, it prob­ably looked better on paper in the plan­ning stages. With two of the finest writers of the time under con­tract (Mann and Weil), they prob­ably should have come up with some­thing a little better. Most of the tunes re­flect the rev­o­lu­tionary rhetoric of the times, with ti­tles like Fifty Two Per­cent and Four­teen Or Fight.

There is one promising cut though: Shape Of Things To Come could have been a real hit for a de­cent band like the Grass Roots. Under the weight of Les Bax­ter’s heavy-handed arrange­ments, though, it hardly stands a chance—much like the rest of the album. For the brave at heart.” (All­Music)

“I have no idea why this great movie fre­quently goes out of print. It’s one of the great teen­sploita­tion films of the psy­che­delic era. Fea­turing a great sound­track along the lines of Vanilla Fudge-Monkees-Strawberry Alarm Clock: [that is] canned, listener-friendly, bluesy, acid-rock. It’s a fun listen that will def­i­nitely take you back in time.” (Eddie Lands­berg)

I agree with Matthew: the songs sound like Mr. Mann and Ms. Weil were at­tempting some­thing for which they were not suited. Like so many movies who rely on “pro­fes­sional” song­writers in­stead of ac­tual genre writers (rock seems to get the worst of it), it comes across as more weenyful (sic) than mean­ingful.

It un­der­mines the movie: no one who per­forms this type of music would mo­ti­vate anyone but pre-teenyboppers, and only then to tear out their pic­tures from Tiger Beat and tack them to their bed­room walls.

I agree with Eddie: the sound­track as an ar­ti­fact of the period—especially when you know the movie that the music ac­com­pa­nies and illustrates—is a fun listen and will cer­tainly take you back in time. I don’t quite get the Fudge-Monkees-Alarm Clock con­nec­tion.

“Will my ’60s pro­ducer run for pres­i­dent someday? The car­toon of him on the cover of our awful ver­sion of the sound­track shows what his goal was. As I told it in Fuz mag­a­zine, I was a robot on this one—the powers-that-be de­cided it was passé to use fuzz tone!?! We recorded a much-improved re­make of Shape Of Things To Come for a 1998 single.” (Davie Allan)

The Avid Record Col­lector wel­comes any and all ad­di­tions and cor­rec­tions to this article—whether major or minor, whether to the text above or the list­ings below—are al­ways wel­come. 

Here are the other chap­ters:

• The Avid Record Col­lec­tors Price Guide to “Wild in the Streets” Part 1
• The Avid Record Col­lec­tors Price Guide to “Wild in the Streets” Part 2
• The Avid Record Col­lec­tors Price Guide to “Wild in the Streets” Part 3

 


FOOTNOTES:

1  The values as­signed here and every­where else on any of my site re­flects the price that an es­tab­lished dealer with years of ex­pe­ri­ence and a good rep­u­ta­tion would get for this record. (At least this!) It does not re­flect what sellers on eBay get for records (al­though that may not al­ways be true.). Should you choose to sell your records, do not ex­pect to get these prices.

2  “WILD IN THE STREETS was pop­ular and likely ex­ists as a Capitol Record Club issue, num­bered SKAO-2-5099. I found someone claiming to have a record with that number. How­ever, since he had no pho­to­graph, well …” – Frank Daniels

3  When I asked Davie whether he had played on the two Harley Hatcher tracks on the album (Pen­tagon Square and Rocky Road To Wash­ington), he re­it­er­ated, “I did lead on that en­tire album, which I put in the #1 spot for Worst Ar­rows Album Ever!!! The so-called powers that be said the fuzz was passé and like a com­plete idiot I agreed to do that hor­rible album.”

This album is often re­ferred to and listed (in­cor­rectly) in discogra­phies, price guides, and cat­a­logs merely as WILD IN THE STREETS and cred­ited (also in­cor­rectly but not in­ac­cu­rately) solely to Davie Allan.

 

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far out man, don’t forget the hey­burners.

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