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the avid collector’s guide to wild in the streets part 3

THE AVID COLLECTOR’S GUIDE to Wild In The Streets Part 3 ad­dresses records made that are as­so­ci­ated with this movie—both sin­gles and al­bums. All were re­leased in the wake of the very suc­cessful movie in 1968, but few were hits. Be­fore com­mencing, I rec­om­mend that you first readOn Wild In The Streets As Polit­ical And Social Satire” and then the first part of this four-part se­ries of ar­ti­cles about the movie and its music.

The movie Wild In The Streets was re­leased to Amer­ican the­aters on May 29, 1968. Since people who have just seen a movie are more likely to pur­chase the movie’s music, it was common prac­tice to re­lease the movie’s sound­track album in ad­vance of the movie. That way, it was on sale at a re­tail shop near you wher­ever you saw the movie. 1

 

People who have just seen a movie are more likely to pur­chase the movie’s music on a sound­track album.

 

But the WILD IN THE STREETS sound­track album may have been is­sued after the movie: the June 1, 1968 issue of Bill­board noted, “A major pro­mo­tional ef­fort is also un­derway for the sound­track of the Amer­ican In­ter­na­tional film Wild In The Streets.” The album did not début on that magazine’s album survey until July 6, 1968, in­di­cating a re­lease in mid-June. 2

With this third part, I ex­plain how to tell the var­ious press­ings of records man­u­fac­tured by Capitol Records for their Tower im­print. These al­bums are:

• Var­ious artists: Wild In The Streets (sound­track)
• Max Frost & The Troopers: Shape Of Things To Come
• The Second Time: Listen To The Music
The Ar­rows: Wild In The Streets

Please note that when dis­cussing record albums—which con­sist of a record in a paper sleeve in a card­board jacket—I do not use the word pressing and printing in­ter­change­ably. Records are man­u­fac­tured at pressing plants and may have one or more pressing. Album jackets have their front and back cover slicks man­u­fac­tured at print shops and may have one or more printing.

 

Streets Part 3: front cover to Davie Allan's album WILD IN THEE STREETS.

Davie Al­lan’s fourth album was ti­tled “The Ar­rows Play Music From The Score Of The Mo­tion Pic­ture Wild In The Streets”—easily one of the un­like­liest ti­tles ever to make a teenager fork over three bucks for a record! The record fea­tures Allan playing lead guitar over pre­vi­ously re­leased tracks. That is, de­spite the album credits, there are no Ar­rows on this album. (But the cover art is kind of neat!)

Tower record label variations

From their first re­lease in 1964 into late 1968 or early ‘69, Tower’s la­bels on both their 45s and LPs were an ugly dark orange—although others refer to them as brown. There are sev­eral minor vari­a­tions on this label that are im­por­tant in de­lin­eating first press­ings from later; they are noted below. In 1969, Tower switched their LPs to an equally ugly label of col­ored stripes.

Most records re­leased by Capitol and its sub­sidiaries had at least two label vari­a­tions: one each from the company’s pri­mary pressing plants in Los An­geles, Cal­i­fornia, and Scranton, Penn­syl­vania. The eas­iest way to tell the dif­fer­ence be­tween West Coast and East Coast press­ings is by ex­am­ining the record’s la­bels. 3

West Coast pressings

Records pressed in Los An­geles had their la­bels printed by Bert-Co Press. The Los An­geles la­bels often had the first song on each side listed above the spindle hole, with the re­maining tracks below the hole.

On the right side, the cat­alog number info is on two lines—here as STEREO / SKAO-5099—with the nu­meral ‘1’ with serifs.

The bottom of the label reads ei­ther MFD. IN U.S.A. (1964-1968) or MANUFACTURED IN THE U.S.A. BY CAPITOL RECORDS, INC. (1968-1969).

East Coast pressings

Records pressed in Scranton had their la­bels done by Key­stone Printed Spe­cial­ties Co., Inc., on label back­drops from Queens Litho of Long Is­land City, New York. The Scranton la­bels have all the songs listed below the spindle hole.

On the right side, the cat­alog number info is on three lines—here as STEREO / SKAO-5099 / (SKAO-5099)—with the nu­meral ‘l’ without serifs.

The bottom of the label reads ei­ther MFD. IN U.S.A. (1964-1968) or MANUFACTURED IN THE U.S.A. BY CAPITOL RECORDS, INC. (1968-1969).

For ex­am­ples to il­lus­trate vari­a­tions in the or­ange label records, I used stereo press­ings of Pink Floyd’s THE PIPER AT THE GATES OF DAWN (Tower ST-5093). I chose this record be­cause the vari­a­tions are so well doc­u­mented on­line, which is not true of the records re­lated to Wild In The Streets.

1964-1968

Streets Part 3: original West Coast label for Tower Records albums 1964-1968.

West Coast record with or­ange la­bels with MFD. IN U.S.A. at the bottom. Note the large ring in­dented into the record about 1½ inches from the spindle hole; the small, dense STEREO with the cat­alog number listed once below it; and the nu­meral ‘1’ with serifs at the top and bottom. There is a small gap be­tween STEREO and ST-5093.

 

Streets Part 3: original West Coast label variation for Tower Records albums 1964-1968.

West Coast record with or­ange la­bels with MFD. IN U.S.A. at the bottom. Note the large ring in­dented into the record about 1½ inches from the spindle hole; the small, dense STEREO with the cat­alog number listed once below it; and the nu­meral ‘1’ with a serif at the top. On this vari­a­tion, there is a large gap be­tween STEREO and ST-5093.

 

Streets Part 3: original East Coast label for Tower Records albums 1964-1968.

East Coast record with or­ange la­bels with MFD. IN U.S.A. at the bottom. Note the small ring in­dented into the record about ½ inch from the spindle hole; the large, thin STEREO with the cat­alog number and ma­trix number below it; and the nu­meral ‘l’ without serifs.

1968-1969

Streets Part 3: original West Coast label for Tower Records albums 1968-1969.

West Coast record with or­ange la­bels with MANUFACTURED IN THE U.S.A. BY CAPITOL RECORDS, INC. at the bottom. Note the ring in­dented into the record about 1½ inches from the spindle hole; the small, dense STEREO with the cat­alog number listed once below it; and the ser­ifed ‘1’ to the right. There is a small gap be­tween STEREO and ST-5093.

1969-1970

Streets Part 3: original label for Tower Records albums 1969-1970.

To­wards the end of its run, Tower switched to this busy, striped de­sign with four colors. There are no known press­ings of any of the records as­so­ci­ated with Wild In The Streets (Tower 5099, 5139, or 5147) with this striped label. This would seem to in­di­cate that the de­mand for these al­bums ceased and there were no more press runs or­dered by Capitol. 4

Trail-off information

For those readers in­ter­ested in having a better un­der­standing of the tech­nical in­for­ma­tion stamped or en­graved into the trail-off area (also known as ‘dead wax’), click on over to the Pink Floyd Archives web­site and read “How to Read Record Se­crets of the Ma­trix.” Scroll down to Ma­trix In­for­ma­tion and while the day away! 

 

Streets Part 3: original back cover for Pink Floyd's first album on Tower Records albums 1967.

The image above is the lower right corner of the back cover of THE PIPER AT THE GATES OF DAWN. Note the tiny 6 in the lower right corner: this number in­di­cates that this jacket was printed and as­sem­bled in Los An­geles. It does not have any­thing what­so­ever to do with first or later print­ings of the jacket.

Tower jacket variations

The album jackets—also re­ferred to as ‘covers’ in the US and ‘sleeves’ in the UK—used by Capitol were man­u­fac­tured by in­de­pen­dent printers, each af­fil­i­ated with one par­tic­ular pressing plant. With a few ex­cep­tions, there is rarely any marked dif­fer­ence be­tween the print­ings of the jackets.

On most jackets, there is a small number printed in the lower right corner of the back cover. This number des­ig­nates which com­pany printed the cover slicks.

Ap­par­ently, Capitol began this num­bering with ‘2’ as jackets with a ‘1’ are not known to exist. The num­bers used by Capitol’s printers were: 5

Scranton:        2, 3
Jack­sonville:  4, 9, 16
Los An­geles:   5, 6, 18
Win­chester:   11, 12, 21

The cor­rect pressing of the record is usu­ally found in the cor­rect printing of the jacket. As record com­pa­nies often or­dered larger quan­ti­ties of jackets to keep the per-unit cost as low as pos­sible, the orig­inal printing was often over­stocked and used with later press­ings of the records.

“Keep in mind that these des­ig­na­tion num­bers do not in­di­cate order of re­lease. Many cover slick printing fac­to­ries were used si­mul­ta­ne­ously, and it is pos­sible that any pressing could be put with any [jacket] number de­pending on the record company’s in­ven­tory at the time.” (Pink Floyd Archives)

“The num­bering system was never true for a color gate­fold album jacket. There are num­bers only on black-and-white back covers. Capitol used dif­ferent com­pa­nies for black-and-white back covers than they used for the color front covers.” (Frank Daniels)

 

This is the front cover to Tower Records ver­sion of Pink Floyd’s Piper At The Gates Of Dawn album. Re­leased in 1967, it sold mod­estly well in the US. It is right­fully con­sid­ered a land­mark of the Psy­che­delic Six­ties and has been a consistent—if still modest—seller ever since.

On grading records

In grading records and most other col­lec­tables, NM means ‘near mint,’ a grade as­signed to an item that ap­pears to be al­most new. Learning to dif­fer­en­tiate be­tween grades is a task that has proven to be very, very dif­fi­cult in­deed to ac­com­plish for many buyers and sellers of records. This lack of ability has made buying records on the In­ternet as pre­dictable as calling num­bers on a roulette wheel.

I am listing the specifics of the la­bels only of those records that I was able to find im­ages of on­line. At this time, col­lec­tors have not dis­crim­i­nated be­tween the press­ings with any of the Wild In The Streets al­bums, so the as­signed values below apply to any pressing. 

For more in­for­ma­tion on this topic, see my ar­ticle “On Grading Records” on this site.

 

Streets Part 3: 1968 newspaper advertisement for the movie WILD IN THE STREETS..

FEATURED IMAGE: The art­work at the top of this page was lifted from an ad­ver­tise­ment for the movie that ap­peared in news­pa­pers around the country in 1968. The four in­ter­con­nected ar­ti­cles can be found here:

• The Avid Col­lec­tors Guide to “Wild in the Streets” Part 1
• The Avid Col­lec­tors Guide to “Wild in the Streets” Part 2

• The Avid Col­lec­tors Guide to “Wild in the Streets” Part 3
• The Avid Col­lec­tors Guide to “Wild in the Streets” Part 4

 


FOOTNOTES:

1   For a con­tem­po­rary re­view of the move—and a very en­thu­si­astic one at that—see: “Blunt Phi­los­ophy With Dual Ex­hausts and a Clear Logic: Singer Runs Country in ‘Wild in the Streets’” by Re­nata Adler ap­peared in the May 30, 1968, issue of the New York Times. The movie was a hit: ac­cording to the Jan­uary 8, 1969 issue of Va­riety mag­a­zine, it had grossed $4,000,000 in rentals in the US in 1968—which means it made many, many times more in box of­fice receipts—with a pro­duc­tion cost of only $700,000.

2   The album was re­viewed in the New Album Re­leases of the June 22, 1968, issue of Bill­board, in­di­cating a re­lease date of about June 10—which ex­plains its late début on that mag­a­zine’s survey. (Cour­tesy of Frank Daniels)

3   Bigger selling ti­tles would also have press­ings done at Capitol’s sec­ondary plants at Win­chester, Vir­ginia, and Jack­sonville, Illi­nois.

4   “After some point in time, Tower Records had their West Coast records pressed by con­tract out­side of Capitol. Tower also had a sep­a­rate tape con­tract, so that their 8-tracks, 4-tracks, and cas­settes were made by GRC, in­stead of by Au­diopak.” (Frank Daniels)

5   Jackets do exist without a printer’s number on the back cover. They may be the number ‘1’ in Capi­tol’s method.

 

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