of cabbages and kings, of arks and attics (the pseudo-psychedelic sound of chad & jeremy part 5)

Estimated reading time is 14 minutes.THIS IS THE FIFTH of five articles devoted to the trio of albums and their related singles that Chad & Jeremy released in 1967-1968. OF CABBAGES AND KINGS and THE ARK and the soundtrack to 3 IN THE ATTIC reflect the more ‘pop’-oriented psychedelicism of the English musicians at the time and have long been held in a bit of contempt by older aficionados and collectors of Sixties psych. Too bad, as they are almost uniformly fine recordings!

In 1967-1969, there was no real interest in the three albums that are the focus of these essays. This is the period when they were in-print and should have been at the peak of their demand from fans, impulse buyers, and what few avid collectors existed at the time. Like me.)


Front cover to Chad & Jeremy's OF CABBAGES AND KINGS album (1967).

Of cabbages and arks

With OF CABBAGES AND KINGS, Columbia had some expectations, consequently printing considerably more copies of that album than THE ARK. So it was is and ever shall be that the latter is considerably more difficult to find than the former. But there is now and has been for decades considerably more collector interest in OF CABBAGES AND KINGS. I attribute this to three factors:

1. The 1967 album has a groovier (“much more groovy”?) title than the 1968 album, the latter of which allows a religious inference that was often a sales-killer in the pre-Christian Right era.

2. The 1967 album has a much more groovy (“much groovier”?) front cover, the kitschy photo of our lads beating Charles Bragg’s loverly painting hands down!

3. The two factors above and the relative rarity of the 1968 title has always made the first the better known, therefore the more discussed and requested of the two.

The first two factors above (about the title and the cover) contribute to a fourth factor that is rarely, if ever, taken into consideration: the item’s degree of “Sixties kitschiness.” Both the Alice reference and the delightfully campy cover photo make the album a near priceless artifact of the Sixties, a time so filled with energetic awakenings that things like this did not seem the least bit tacky..

The psychedelic and the kitsch

The “Sixties” can be defined as an “era” that started with the assassination of President Kennedy in November 1963 (and the beginning of the coup d’état made known to most people through the movie JFK) and the subsequent invasion of the Beatles into America’s consciousness in February 1964, and ended with the reelection of Nixon in 1972.

This was a time so filled with energetic awakenings that things like this did not seem the least bit tacky. Except to the reactionaries in the rock and roll camp, of which there were many. Alas, many of these (young, white, geeky) reactionaries grew into record reviewers and had a huge impact on the revisionism of the Sixties that followed in the ’70s and ’80s.

One of the reasons for the two albums’ being overlooked by psych collectors for decades is the fact that psych collectors tend to be a serious lot. They also tend to look askance at those things that paint their passion/obsession in a somewhat frivolous light.


Cabbages: Front cover to Chad & Jeremy's THE ARK album (1968).

The end of mono era in America

In 1968, American record manufacturers ceased the production of new albums in both mono and stereo. From mid-68 on, new albums were issued in stereo only. (There were exceptions where older material was released in its original mono sound.)

By the end of ’68, most of the major had accounted for all of the mono returns and began dumping those mono LPs on the market at below normal bargain bin prices.

In Edwardsville, Pennsylvania, a large department store –whose name escapes me fifty years later (Arlan’s?) but the likes of which served as the foundation for such contemporary chains as K-Mart—had a grand opening. Their big draw was that they had purchased millions of cut-out record albums (mostly mono) at pennies on the dollar. For the first few months, these albums sold for 50¢ apiece! These were all factory-sealed, unplayed, mostly mono records!

I can’t tell you how many trips I made there after school, spending hours flipping through the LPs and buying however much my savings allowed. It was here that I picked up my copies of OF CABBAGES AND KINGS and THE ARK. I loved about half the material on the two albums, wishing that I had a tape deck so that I could compile one killer “album” that would blow my friends’ minds.

(An attempt at this was made by Columbia Legacy with their recent PAINTED DAYGLOW SMILE compilation, the second half of which collects some of the stronger tracks from these LPs.)


Cabbages: Front cover to the 3 IN THE ATTIC soundtrack album (1968).

The Avid Record Collector’s Price Guide

Below follows a “price guide”—actually, an “estimated value guide”—for the LPs and 45s recorded and released in 1967-69 for the three album projects: OF CABBAGES AND KINGSTHE ARK, and the THREE IN THE ATTIC soundtrack. The records are listed in order of release, which is based on the best data that I could find regarding their release dates.

Please keep in mind that the values assigned below reflect what an established, reputable seller would probably get from a knowledgeable buyer. That is, these values are NOT the prices that you, a collector or novice dealer, will necessarily get for these records.

Likewise, these are not the prices that you should expect to have to pay for any of these records from a “normal” seller. Also, while the three LPs are readily available for reasonable prices, the 45s are not so easily found—especially the commercially issued pressings! Despite the rarity of these stock copies, the values assigned by me are rather low.

This is due to the fact that there is at this time very little demand for these records. Were the psych-pop recordings of Chad & jeremy to be “discovered” by collectors of ’60s psych singles, these records would skyrocket in value. (Don’t hold your breath waiting on that . . .)

08/67

Family Way / Rest In Peace (Columbia 4-44131, promo)
Family Way / Rest In Peace (Columbia 4-44131)

Both sides are taken from the upcoming album. This was our first glimpse of the “new” Chad & Jeremy. Nobody paid any attention.

There are NO listings for this record on Popsike, indicating one of two possibilities: 1) no copies of this record were sold at auction on eBay for more than $25, although copies could have been sold for less; or 2), no copies of this record were sold on eBay at all, because none were offered or those offered fetched NO bids.

If the former, then I would suggest a NM value of $10-20 for the record. If the latter, it could mean one of to things: 1) that not a single seller thought the record worth listing; or 2) that the record is so rare that none were found to list! 

I will go out on a limb here limb and assign the commercial record a suggested NM value of $25-50—although it’s probably worth twice that but would only sell for half that on eBay, a venue not known for its horde of light headed pop rock . . .

09/67

OF CABBAGES AND KINGS (Columbia CL-2671, mono)
OF CABBAGES AND KINGS (Columbia CS-9471, stereo)

The mono pressing used to be a bargain bin staple but now appears to be more difficult to find than the stereo version. There is only one listing for it on Popsike: an open copy with the unplayed record still sealed in its inner plastic, baggy-like sleeve sold for $43 in 2012.

I am going to do that which I claim never to do: I am going to assume that other copies have sold on eBay for less than $25, as it is simply not that difficult a record to find. That doesn’t leave a lot with which to speculate, but I would guess a NM copy would sell for $20-30.

The stereo pressing is a little easier to find: four copies registered on Popsike in 2013. Two were graded VG+ and EX (I am assuming these are similar grades but I can’t really know), and sold for $22 and $26, respectively. A copy graded EX+ (and I assume that is similar to NM sold for $35.With these figures, I would assign a NM value of $20-25 to this record.

In 2012, a stock copy with the record still sealed in its inner plastic, baggy-like sleeve and with a DJ title & timing sticker affixed to the front cover of the jacket sold for a mere $27!

In 2013, a factory sealed copy sold for $67, which seems low to me.

Again I am going to assume that other copies have sold on eBay for less than $25, as it is simply not that difficult a record to find. That doesn’t leave a lot with which to speculate, but I would guess a NM copy would sell for $20-25.

10/67

THE ASTROLOGY ALBUM (Columbia CL-2689, mono)
THE ASTROLOGY ALBUM
 (Columbia CS 9489, stereo)

Regarding this remarkable record (if only for its being curioser than many album projects of the time), I shall allow the inimitable Jason have his say:

“Bar none, this is the strangest Chad & Jeremy-related record ever issued. This LP, a pet project of producer Gary Usher, featured ‘Your horoscope and character analysis in music and narration.’ Occasionally, it also features brief comments from various stoned-out hippies and Columbia rock stars, including David Crosby.

Thankfully, C&J manage to give their comments without [sounding] high as a kite—unlike virtually everyone else interviewed on this record, who essentially say, ‘Yeah, man. Astrology is like, ya know, so far out. It’s just there. Yeah . . .’ I kid you not!” (Jason’s Chad & Jeremy Archive)

Needless to say, there is not a helluva lot of demand for this bit of pre-NewAge silliness, despite the presence of soon-to-be superstar Crosby. Both mono and stereo copies can be found for less than $20—often a lot less. Initial copies included a 22x33 inch Zodiac Wall Chart, which has very little effect on the value of the album.

11/67

Painted Dayglow Smile / Painted Dayglow Smile (Columbia 4-44379, promo)
Painted Dayglow Smile / Editorial (Columbia 4-44379)
Painted Dayglow Smile / Painted Dayglow Smile (Columbia 4-44379, “Reservice” promo)

Painted Dayglow Smile is from the upcoming THE ARK while Editorial is from OF CABBAGES AND KINGS. The first white label promotional pressings from late 1967 do not mention “Reservice” on the labels. 

The second white label promotional pressing from 1968 has “Special Rush Reservice” printed on the label. This reissue was done to promote THE ARK and is the rarer of the two promos.

The two promo pressings are rather rare—the demand for these records is also rather rare. There are no listings for this record on Popsike, meaning that there have no sales of this record on eBay with a price in excess of $25. So it is that I am placing a suggested NM value of $10-15 on the first promo and $15-20 on the second (although they can be found for less on the internet).

“Commercial copies of this 45 are near impossible to find, and there are two different dual-A-sided promos as well as an A-and-B sided promo.” Finally, despite Jason’s statement, stock copies of Columbia 4-44379 (with red labels) may not exist! (Jason’s Chad & Jeremy Archive)

04/68

Sister Marie / Rest In Peace (Columbia 4-44525, promo)
Sister Marie / Rest In Peace (Columbia 4-44525)

With only one new track, Columbia coupled it with Rest In Peace from OF CABBAGES AND KINGSThere are NO listings for this record on Popsike, indicating one of two possibilities: 1) no copies of this record were sold at auction on eBay for more than $25, although copies could have been sold for less; or 2), no copies of this record were sold on eBay at all, because none were offered or those offered fetched NO bids.

If the former, then I would suggest a NM value of $10-20 for the promo record. If the latter, it could mean one of to things: 1) that not a single seller thought the record worth listing; or 2) that the record is so rare that none were found to list!

I will go out on a limb here and assign the commercial record a suggested NM value of $25-50—although it’s probably worth twice that but would only sell for half that on eBay, a venue not known for its horde of light headed pop rock . . .

“This single is a very rare one. (Jason’s Chad & Jeremy Archive)

09/68

THE ARK (Columbia CL-2899, mono)
THE ARK (Columbia CS-9699, stereo)
THE ARC (Columbia CS-9699, stereo)

Columbia was pressing white label promo copies in mono with the stereo catalog numbers during the late ’60s. This album, long rumored to exist in mono, but there is no verification of that fact at this time.

This is not necessarily easy to find, but neither is there much of a demand for it. Suggested NM value of $20-25.

Copies of this album were apparently issued with a misprint on the front cover, here the title is spelled as “THE ARC.” This a rather rare record indeed, as I have never seen one. I would not hazard a guess at its value, but, after all, it is Chad & Jeremy, so it wouldn’t be that big of a deal . . .

10/68

Paxton Quigley’s Had the Course / You Need Feet (Columbia 4-44660, promo)
Paxton Quigley’s Had the Course / You Need Feet (Columbia 4-44660)
Paxton Quigley’s Had the Course / Paxton Quigley’s Had the Course (Columbia 4-44660, “Reservice” promo) 

Both sides are from THE ARK album. This record may have been only issued as a white label promo, as stock copies are not known to exist at this time. First pressings of the promo (1968) do not mention “Reservice” on the labels; second pressings (1969) have “Special Rush Reservice” printed on the labels.

Columbia was hoping that the new film Three In The Attic—which featured the song Paxton Quigley’s Had the Course, although not sung by Chad & Jeremy—would be a bit of hit, you see, and some of the attention would find its way to Columbia’s Chad & Jeremy records hen on sale. It did not.

The promo 45 and what few commercial copies escaped the warehouse were shipped in a rather bizarre picture sleeve with a black and white photo of a massive Nazi rally in Germany in the 1930s.

“Early on, Columbia got a bit skittish, and shelved this sleeve. But that still doesn’t explain how this strange sleeve got made in the first place. Perhaps somebody at Columbia got mixed up and thought You Need Feet was the A-side, and that it was meant as a serious anti-war statement. At this point, the details are lost to time. When asked about it, Chad told me ‘I have no idea what that was all about. It certainly wasn’t our idea. Very strange!’ Very strange indeed!” (Now and Forever)

I don’t want to want to gainsay (a great word, rarely used today except by twits like me who enjoy making use of the dictionary that is so readily available on the internet) the fine folk at Now and Forever, who are certainly bigger and more knowledgeable fans of Chad & Jeremy that I am, but . . . why would they suggest that You Need Feet could be interpreted as anti-war by anyone?

This record inspired an informational back-and-forth dialog in the Comments section of the 45cat.com entry. Referring to this record, Tokenhippie states that “Finding a USA stock copy is virtually impossible.” Dogear responds with a link to an eBay auction of a stock copy of this record that sold for a whopping $8.00!

The two then engage in a discussion on the rarity of the commercial pressings of all of the Usher-produced Columbia singles from 1967-69. Dogear had the final entry in November 2011:

Three From The Attic was released December 20, 1968. It got mixed reviews but became quite successful in the first part of 1969. In the film, an edited version of the Usher-produced song can be heard over the opening sequence and the end credits. Interestingly, the soundtrack album released by Sidewalk Records replaced Chad & Jeremy’s version by a rerecording done by Max Frost and the Troopers, which was released as a 45.”

TokenHippie remarks that the stock copy of Columbia 4-44660 that Dogear linked to the conversation is “the first USA stock copy I’ve seen since I’ve been aware of it since back in the mid-’80s. Even the promo copies are not that common. I just found Painted Dayglow Smile two months ago—and it’s a promo, of course.”

To which Dogear responds, “Compared to their mid-’60s stuff, the Usher produced 45s seem to be quite rare as stock copies. The one I’m still after is Family Way / Rest In Peace.” (PS: For more on the Max Frost single, see below see below.)

10/68

THREE IN THE ATTIC (Sidewalk ST-5918, stereo)

This is not necessarily easy to find, but neither is there much of a demand for it. A single copy is listed on Popsike: a white label promo graded NM- sold for $17 in 2013 .That’s it, so I am placing a suggested NM value of $15-20 on both the promo and the stock copy.

04/69

Good Morning Sunrise / Paxton’s Song (Sidewalk 944)

Unlike the LP, this 45 credits Chad Stuart solely as the artist. It was issued as both a white label promo and a stock copy (yellow labels). Apparently, both were initially shipped in a black and white picture sleeve with an image of the album cover on the front. 

As I write this, a stock copy graded VG+ is available on eBay with a But It Now price of $11.00—and, of course, no one has bought it as what is really a bargain basement asking price!

Although rare, so too is the demand fir the record rare. Therefore, I will suggest a NM value of $10-15 on the promo and stock copies of the record and also for the picture sleeve.

This record is the final original single release from either Chad or Jeremy until 1983’s “Bite The Bullet.”

To sum this up: while these Stuart-Clyde-Usher singles are very hard to find, there is little demand for them outside of a small circle of friends. As the inimitable Jason states about Chad’s Sidewalk single, it is both an “extremely rare and extremely cheap single.” But, like other hard-to-find records with little demand, should you decide that you want a copy next week, you may not find one for a long time!



 

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