of cabbages and kings, of arks and attics (the pseudo-psychedelic sound of chad & jeremy part 5)

THIS IS THE FIFTH of five ar­ti­cles de­voted to the trio of al­bums and their re­lated sin­gles that Chad & Je­remy re­leased in 1967-1968. OF CABBAGES AND KINGS and THE ARK and the sound­track to 3 IN THE ATTIC re­flect the more ‘pop’-oriented psy­che­deli­cism of the Eng­lish mu­si­cians at the time and have long been held in a bit of con­tempt by older afi­cionados and col­lec­tors of Six­ties psych. Too bad, as they are al­most uni­formly fine record­ings!

In 1967-1969, there was no real in­terest in the three al­bums that are the focus of these es­says. This is the pe­riod when they were in-print and should have been at the peak of their de­mand from fans, im­pulse buyers, and what few avid col­lec­tors ex­isted at the time. Like me.)


Front cover to Chad & Jeremy's OF CABBAGES AND KINGS album (1967).

Of cabbages and arks

With OF CABBAGES AND KINGS, Co­lumbia had some ex­pec­ta­tions, con­se­quently printing con­sid­er­ably more copies of that album than THE ARK. So it was is and ever shall be that the latter is con­sid­er­ably more dif­fi­cult to find than the former. But there is now and has been for decades con­sid­er­ably more col­lector in­terest in OF CABBAGES AND KINGS. I at­tribute this to three fac­tors:

1. The 1967 album has a groovier (“much more groovy”?) title than the 1968 album, the latter of which al­lows a re­li­gious in­fer­ence that was often a sales-killer in the pre-Christian Right era.

2. The 1967 album has a much more groovy (“much groovier”?) front cover, the kitschy photo of our lads beating Charles Bragg’s loverly painting hands down!

3. The two fac­tors above and the rel­a­tive rarity of the 1968 title has al­ways made the first the better known, there­fore the more dis­cussed and re­quested of the two.

The first two fac­tors above (about the title and the cover) con­tribute to a fourth factor that is rarely, if ever, taken into con­sid­er­a­tion: the item’s de­gree of “Six­ties kitsch­i­ness.” Both the Alice ref­er­ence and the de­light­fully campy cover photo make the album a near price­less ar­ti­fact of the Six­ties, a time so filled with en­er­getic awak­en­ings that things like this did not seem the least bit tacky..

The psychedelic and the kitsch

The “Six­ties” can be de­fined as an “era” that started with the as­sas­si­na­tion of Pres­i­dent Kennedy in No­vember 1963 (and the be­gin­ning of the coup d’etat made known to most people through the movie JFK) and the sub­se­quent in­va­sion of the Bea­tles into Amer­i­ca’s con­scious­ness in Feb­ruary 1964, and ended with the re­elec­tion of Nixon in 1972.

This was a time so filled with en­er­getic awak­en­ings that things like this did not seem the least bit tacky. Ex­cept to the re­ac­tionaries in the rock and roll camp, of which there were many. Alas, many of these (young, white, geeky) re­ac­tionaries grew into record re­viewers and had a huge im­pact on the re­vi­sionism of the Six­ties that fol­lowed in the ’70s and ’80s.

One of the rea­sons for the two al­bums’ being over­looked by psych col­lec­tors for decades is the fact that psych col­lec­tors tend to be a se­rious lot. They also tend to look askance at those things that paint their passion/obsession in a some­what friv­o­lous light.


Cabbages: Front cover to Chad & Jeremy's THE ARK album (1968).

The end of mono era in America

In 1968, Amer­ican record man­u­fac­turers ceased the pro­duc­tion of new al­bums in both mono and stereo. From mid-68 on, new al­bums were is­sued in stereo only. (There were ex­cep­tions where older ma­te­rial was re­leased in its orig­inal mono sound.)

By the end of ’68, most of the major had ac­counted for all of the mono re­turns and began dumping those mono LPs on the market at below normal bar­gain bin prices.

In Ed­wardsville, Penn­syl­vania, a large de­part­ment store –whose name es­capes me fifty years later (Ar­lan’s?) but the likes of which served as the foun­da­tion for such con­tem­po­rary chains as K-Mart—had a grand opening. Their big draw was that they had pur­chased mil­lions of cut-out record al­bums (mostly mono) at pen­nies on the dollar. For the first few months, these al­bums sold for 50¢ apiece! These were all factory-sealed, un­played, mostly mono records!

I can’t tell you how many trips I made there after school, spending hours flip­ping through the LPs and buying how­ever much my sav­ings al­lowed. It was here that I picked up my copies of OF CABBAGES AND KINGS and THE ARK. I loved about half the ma­te­rial on the two al­bums, wishing that I had a tape deck so that I could com­pile one killer “album” that would blow my friends’ minds.

(An at­tempt at this was made by Co­lumbia Legacy with their re­cent PAINTED DAYGLOW SMILE com­pi­la­tion, the second half of which col­lects some of the stronger tracks from these LPs.)


Cabbages: Front cover to the 3 IN THE ATTIC soundtrack album (1968).

The Avid Record Collector’s Price Guide

Below fol­lows a “price guide”—actually, an “es­ti­mated value guide”—for the LPs and 45s recorded and re­leased in 1967-69 for the three album projects: OF CABBAGES AND KINGSTHE ARK, and the THREE IN THE ATTIC sound­track. The records are listed in order of re­lease, which is based on the best data that I could find re­garding their re­lease dates.

Please keep in mind that the values as­signed below re­flect what an es­tab­lished, rep­utable seller would prob­ably get from a knowl­edge­able buyer. That is, these values are NOT the prices that you, a col­lector or novice dealer, will nec­es­sarily get for these records.

Like­wise, these are not the prices that you should ex­pect to have to pay for any of these records from a “normal” seller. Also, while the three LPs are readily avail­able for rea­son­able prices, the 45s are not so easily found—especially the com­mer­cially is­sued press­ings! De­spite the rarity of these stock copies, the values as­signed by me are rather low.

This is due to the fact that there is at this time very little de­mand for these records. Were the psych-pop record­ings of Chad & je­remy to be “dis­cov­ered” by col­lec­tors of ’60s psych sin­gles, these records would sky­rocket in value. (Don’t hold your breath waiting on that …)

08/67

Family Way / Rest In Peace (Co­lumbia 4-44131, promo)
Family Way / Rest In Peace (Co­lumbia 4-44131)

Both sides are taken from the up­coming album. This was our first glimpse of the “new” Chad & Je­remy. No­body paid any at­ten­tion.

There are NO list­ings for this record on Pop­sike, in­di­cating one of two pos­si­bil­i­ties: 1) no copies of this record were sold at auc­tion on eBay for more than $25, al­though copies could have been sold for less; or 2), no copies of this record were sold on eBay at all, be­cause none were of­fered or those of­fered fetched NO bids.

If the former, then I would sug­gest a NM value of $10-20 for the record. If the latter, it could mean one of to things: 1) that not a single seller thought the record worth listing; or 2) that the record is so rare that none were found to list! 

I will go out on a limb here limb and as­sign the com­mer­cial record a sug­gested NM value of $25-50—although it’s prob­ably worth twice that but would only sell for half that on eBay, a venue not known for its horde of light headed pop rock …

09/67

OF CABBAGES AND KINGS (Co­lumbia CL-2671, mono)
OF CABBAGES AND KINGS (Co­lumbia CS-9471, stereo)

The mono pressing used to be a bar­gain bin staple but now ap­pears to be more dif­fi­cult to find than the stereo ver­sion. There is only one listing for it on Pop­sike: an open copy with the un­played record still sealed in its inner plastic, baggy-like sleeve sold for $43 in 2012.

I am going to do that which I claim never to do: I am going to as­sume that other copies have sold on eBay for less than $25, as it is simply not that dif­fi­cult a record to find. That doesn’t leave a lot with which to spec­u­late, but I would guess a NM copy would sell for $20-30.

The stereo pressing is a little easier to find: four copies reg­is­tered on Pop­sike in 2013. Two were graded VG+ and EX (I am as­suming these are sim­ilar grades but I can’t re­ally know), and sold for $22 and $26, re­spec­tively. A copy graded EX+ (and I as­sume that is sim­ilar to NM sold for $35.With these fig­ures, I would as­sign a NM value of $20-25 to this record.

In 2012, a stock copy with the record still sealed in its inner plastic, baggy-like sleeve and with a DJ title & timing sticker af­fixed to the front cover of the jacket sold for a mere $27!

In 2013, a fac­tory sealed copy sold for $67, which seems low to me.

Again I am going to as­sume that other copies have sold on eBay for less than $25, as it is simply not that dif­fi­cult a record to find. That doesn’t leave a lot with which to spec­u­late, but I would guess a NM copy would sell for $20-25.

10/67

THE ASTROLOGY ALBUM (Co­lumbia CL-2689, mono)
THE ASTROLOGY ALBUM
 (Co­lumbia CS 9489, stereo)

Re­garding this re­mark­able record (if only for its being cu­rioser than many album projects of the time), I shall allow the inim­itable Jason have his say:

“Bar none, this is the strangest Chad & Jeremy-related record ever is­sued. This LP, a pet project of pro­ducer Gary Usher, fea­tured ‘Your horo­scope and char­acter analysis in music and nar­ra­tion.’ Oc­ca­sion­ally, it also fea­tures brief com­ments from var­ious stoned-out hip­pies and Co­lumbia rock stars, in­cluding David Crosby.

Thank­fully, C&J manage to give their com­ments without [sounding] high as a kite—unlike vir­tu­ally everyone else in­ter­viewed on this record, who es­sen­tially say, ‘Yeah, man. As­trology is like, ya know, so far out. It’s just there. Yeah …’ I kid you not!” (Ja­son’s Chad & Je­remy Archive)

Need­less to say, there is not a hel­luva lot of de­mand for this bit of pre-NewAge silli­ness, de­spite the pres­ence of soon-to-be su­per­star Crosby. Both mono and stereo copies can be found for less than $20—often a lot less. Ini­tial copies in­cluded a 22×33 inch Zo­diac Wall Chart, which has very little ef­fect on the value of the album.

11/67

Painted Day­glow Smile / Painted Day­glow Smile (Co­lumbia 4-44379, promo)
Painted Day­glow Smile / Ed­i­to­rial (Co­lumbia 4-44379)
Painted Day­glow Smile / Painted Day­glow Smile (Co­lumbia 4-44379, “Re­ser­vice” promo)

Painted Day­glow Smile is from the up­coming THE ARK while Ed­i­to­rial is from OF CABBAGES AND KINGS. The first white label pro­mo­tional press­ings from late 1967 do not men­tion “Re­ser­vice” on the la­bels. 

The second white label pro­mo­tional pressing from 1968 has “Spe­cial Rush Re­ser­vice” printed on the label. This reissue was done to pro­mote THE ARK and is the rarer of the two promos.

The two promo press­ings are rather rare—the de­mand for these records is also rather rare. There are no list­ings for this record on Pop­sike, meaning that there have no sales of this record on eBay with a price in ex­cess of $25. So it is that I am placing a sug­gested NM value of $10-15 on the first promo and $15-20 on the second (al­though they can be found for less on the in­ternet).

“Com­mer­cial copies of this 45 are near im­pos­sible to find, and there are two dif­ferent dual-A-sided promos as well as an A-and-B sided promo.” Fi­nally, de­spite Ja­son’s state­ment, stock copies of Co­lumbia 4-44379 (with red la­bels) may not exist! (Ja­son’s Chad & Je­remy Archive)

04/68

Sister Marie / Rest In Peace (Co­lumbia 4-44525, promo)
Sister Marie / Rest In Peace (Co­lumbia 4-44525)

With only one new track, Co­lumbia cou­pled it with Rest In Peace from OF CABBAGES AND KINGSThere are NO list­ings for this record on Pop­sike, in­di­cating one of two pos­si­bil­i­ties: 1) no copies of this record were sold at auc­tion on eBay for more than $25, al­though copies could have been sold for less; or 2), no copies of this record were sold on eBay at all, be­cause none were of­fered or those of­fered fetched NO bids.

If the former, then I would sug­gest a NM value of $10-20 for the promo record. If the latter, it could mean one of to things: 1) that not a single seller thought the record worth listing; or 2) that the record is so rare that none were found to list!

I will go out on a limb here and as­sign the com­mer­cial record a sug­gested NM value of $25-50—although it’s prob­ably worth twice that but would only sell for half that on eBay, a venue not known for its horde of light headed pop rock …

“This single is a very rare one. (Ja­son’s Chad & Je­remy Archive)

09/68

THE ARK (Co­lumbia CL-2899, mono)
THE ARK (Co­lumbia CS-9699, stereo)
THE ARC (Co­lumbia CS-9699, stereo)

Co­lumbia was pressing white label promo copies in mono with the stereo cat­alog num­bers during the late ’60s. This album, long ru­mored to exist in mono, but there is no ver­i­fi­ca­tion of that fact at this time.

This is not nec­es­sarily easy to find, but nei­ther is there much of a de­mand for it. Sug­gested NM value of $20-25.

Copies of this album were ap­par­ently is­sued with a mis­print on the front cover, here the title is spelled as “THE ARC.” This a rather rare record in­deed, as I have never seen one. I would not hazard a guess at its value, but, after all, it is Chad & Je­remy, so it wouldn’t be that big of a deal …

10/68

Paxton Quigley’s Had the Course / You Need Feet (Co­lumbia 4-44660, promo)
Paxton Quigley’s Had the Course / You Need Feet (Co­lumbia 4-44660)
Paxton Quigley’s Had the Course / Paxton Quigley’s Had the Course (Co­lumbia 4-44660, “Re­ser­vice” promo) 

Both sides are from THE ARK album. This record may have been only is­sued as a white label promo, as stock copies are not known to exist at this time. First press­ings of the promo (1968) do not men­tion “Re­ser­vice” on the la­bels; second press­ings (1969) have “Spe­cial Rush Re­ser­vice” printed on the la­bels.

Co­lumbia was hoping that the new film Three In The Attic—which fea­tured the song Paxton Quigley’s Had the Course, al­though not sung by Chad & Jeremy—would be a bit of hit, you see, and some of the at­ten­tion would find its way to Columbia’s Chad & Je­remy records hen on sale. It did not.

The promo 45 and what few com­mer­cial copies es­caped the ware­house were shipped in a rather bizarre pic­ture sleeve with a black and white photo of a mas­sive Nazi rally in Ger­many in the 1930s.

“Early on, Co­lumbia got a bit skit­tish, and shelved this sleeve. But that still doesn’t ex­plain how this strange sleeve got made in the first place. Per­haps some­body at Co­lumbia got mixed up and thought You Need Feet was the A-side, and that it was meant as a se­rious anti-war state­ment. At this point, the de­tails are lost to time. When asked about it, Chad told me ‘I have no idea what that was all about. It cer­tainly wasn’t our idea. Very strange!’ Very strange in­deed!” (Now and For­ever)

I don’t want to want to gainsay (a great word, rarely used today ex­cept by twits like me who enjoy making use of the dic­tio­nary that is so readily avail­able on the in­ternet) the fine folk at Now and For­ever, who are cer­tainly bigger and more knowl­edge­able fans of Chad & Je­remy that I am, but … why would they sug­gest that You Need Feet could be in­ter­preted as anti-war by anyone?

This record in­spired an in­for­ma­tional back-and-forth di­alog in the Com­ments sec­tion of the 45cat.com entry. Re­fer­ring to this record, To­ken­hippie states that “Finding a USA stock copy is vir­tu­ally im­pos­sible.” Do­gear re­sponds with a link to an eBay auc­tion of a stock copy of this record that sold for a whop­ping $8.00!

The two then en­gage in a dis­cus­sion on the rarity of the com­mer­cial press­ings of all of the Usher-produced Co­lumbia sin­gles from 1967-69. Do­gear had the final entry in No­vember 2011:

Three From The Attic was re­leased De­cember 20, 1968. It got mixed re­views but be­came quite suc­cessful in the first part of 1969. In the film, an edited ver­sion of the Usher-produced song can be heard over the opening se­quence and the end credits. In­ter­est­ingly, the sound­track album re­leased by Side­walk Records re­placed Chad & Je­re­my’s ver­sion by a rere­cording done by Max Frost and the Troopers, which was re­leased as a 45.”

To­ken­Hippie re­marks that the stock copy of Co­lumbia 4-44660 that Do­gear linked to the con­ver­sa­tion is “the first USA stock copy I’ve seen since I’ve been aware of it since back in the mid-’80s. Even the promo copies are not that common. I just found Painted Day­glow Smile two months ago—and it’s a promo, of course.”

To which Do­gear re­sponds, “Com­pared to their mid-’60s stuff, the Usher pro­duced 45s seem to be quite rare as stock copies. The one I’m still after is Family Way / Rest In Peace.” (PS: For more on the Max Frost single, see below see below.)

10/68

THREE IN THE ATTIC (Side­walk ST-5918, stereo)

This is not nec­es­sarily easy to find, but nei­ther is there much of a de­mand for it. A single copy is listed on Pop­sike: a white label promo graded NM- sold for $17 in 2013 .That’s it, so I am placing a sug­gested NM value of $15-20 on both the promo and the stock copy.

04/69

Good Morning Sun­rise / Pax­ton’s Song (Side­walk 944)

Un­like the LP, this 45 credits Chad Stuart solely as the artist. It was is­sued as both a white label promo and a stock copy (yellow la­bels). Ap­par­ently, both were ini­tially shipped in a black and white pic­ture sleeve with an image of the album cover on the front. 

As I write this, a stock copy graded VG+ is avail­able on eBay with a But It Now price of $11.00—and, of course, no one has bought it as what is re­ally a bar­gain base­ment asking price!

Al­though rare, so too is the de­mand fir the record rare. There­fore, I will sug­gest a NM value of $10-15 on the promo and stock copies of the record and also for the pic­ture sleeve.

This record is the final orig­inal single re­lease from ei­ther Chad or Je­remy until 1983’s “Bite The Bullet.”

To sum this up: while these Stuart-Clyde-Usher sin­gles are very hard to find, there is little de­mand for them out­side of a small circle of friends. As the inim­itable Jason states about Chad’s Side­walk single, it is both an “ex­tremely rare and ex­tremely cheap single.” But, like other hard-to-find records with little de­mand, should you de­cide that you want a copy next week, you may not find one for a long time!



 

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