dads and hollysiz let the light come through

AS A TARGET OF BULLIES most of my high school years, I have grown up as a rea­son­ably ‘con­trolled’ adult (I have a veeeeeery long, veeeeeery slow-burning fuse to my once hair-trigger temper), con­sti­tu­tion­ally and philo­soph­i­cally anti-violence in­sti­ga­tion (versus the ne­ces­sity of using vi­o­lence in de­fense), but quite ca­pable of taking care of my­self. (Of course, being a 200-pound 6-footer tends to dis­suade most people from get­ting in my face.) 1

Nonethe­less, due to the bul­lying, I have al­most zero tol­er­ance for bul­lies, wher­ever and when­ever I see them. Upon hearing of the Columbine High School mas­sacre in 1999, I did not im­me­di­ately as­sume the shooters were bul­lies or that they were stoners or that they were vic­tims of de­pres­sion or that they were hyp­no­tized by back­wards masked Sa­tanic mes­sages on their heavy metal al­bums.

No, upon hearing of the Columbine High School mas­sacre I turned to Berni and said, “Wanna bet they were two loners who were bul­lied every day?”

Of course she did not take the bet.

Which brings me to a video that showed up as part of my daily email from Up­worthy and ad­dresses two things: human be­ings who grow up with someone on the in­side who doesn’t look like the someone on the out­side, and bul­lying. This video is ti­tled “This kid’s dad is just as bad as the bul­lies at school, until he makes me smile at the end.”

 

HollySiz - The Light (Clip of­fi­ciel)

I was moved by the brief story and for­warded it to all my email con­tacts and I also posted it on my Face­book pages and those of family and friends. While showing it to Berni later in the day, a thought came to me: the pro­ducers of this four-minute video should pull it from dis­tri­b­u­tion and find a writer to turn this into a ninety-minute movie. I can see this as an attention-getter, al­though not nec­es­sarily a block­buster.

But as a film ad­dressing the topics of trans­gender chil­dren, ha­rass­ment and bul­lying in schools, and the need for the sup­port of one’s par­ents against the bul­lying re­gard­less of the rea­sons would grab not only the pub­lic’s at­ten­tion, but also that of the Academy Award voters.  2

 

Hollysiz_b&w

And just who is HollySiz?

So I de­cided to com­pose this brief piece on people who are not on the in­side what everyone sees on the out­side and dads and HollySiz. Ac­cording to Wikipedia, Cé­cile Cro­chon, better known by the stage name Cé­cile Cassel, was born June 25, 1982. She is a French ac­tress and singer. Since 2002, she has ap­peared in a number of films and tele­vi­sion se­ries. She is also a recording artist using the stage name HollySiz.

She is the half-sister of actor Vin­cent Cassel (to Amer­i­cans, known for Oceans Twelve and Oceans Thir­teen) and MC Mathias Cassel (better known as Rockin’ Squat), and the daughter of actor Jean-Pierre Cassel, who ap­peared in dozens of movies since the 1950s.

That’s it.

As a recording artist, she has had one hit in 2013 in France, the dumb but lik­able dance tune Come Back To Me. In the of­fi­cial video for the single, amidst the usual modern dance-plus-gymnastics (and that is not con­de­scen­sion) she in­cor­po­rates some tap-dancing and some moves that ap­pear to be a nod to Elvis Presley!

 

HollySiz_album

Her sole album, MY NAME IS, was also re­leased in 2013 and was a modest best-seller in France. As an ac­tress, she has ap­peared in more than a dozen French movies since 2010. Even her web­site pro­vides little real in­for­ma­tion.

So her recording of The Light from her album was chosen to ac­com­pany the video on trans­gender people and bul­lies and it fit the theme of the video per­fectly. Here are the lyrics:

Let the light come through us
Let’s be­lieve in our­selves
Let’s be­lieve in some­thing

Let the light come through us
Let’s be­lieve in our­selves
Let’s blow the dust on shelves

Let the shouts out locked up in our mouth
Let the shouts out locked up in our mouth

Let us go, let us grow
Let’s be­lieve we can change
Let’s be­lieve in our­selves

Let us go, let us grow
Let’s be­lieve we can change
Let’s blow the dust on shelves

Let the shouts out locked up in our mouth
Let the shouts out locked up in our mouth

Let’s be­lieve in our minds
Let’s be­lieve in our minds
Let’s be­lieve in our minds
Let’s be­lieve we will let the shouts out locked up in our mouth
Let the shouts out locked up in our mouth …

Nice lyrics that neb­u­lously ad­dress the need for each of us to see and rec­og­nize the light of truth, and to see and rec­og­nize the out­rage within us, and  to see and rec­og­nize the need for each of us to ex­press that out­rage to­gether. For those readers who may find the one line con­fusing, read it this way: “Let the shouts out that are locked up in our mouth”

 


FOOTNOTES:

1   No­tice that I said “a” target of bul­lies, not “the” target. That’s be­cause while the victim of bul­lying feels very much alone when picked on, bul­lies rarely pick on just one kid or person. No, they are much more egal­i­tarian, usu­ally having sev­eral if not many tar­gets. As Teddy Roo­sevelt might have said, “Bully for them!”

2   De­spite the fact that the actor who plays the fa­ther in the video re­sem­bles none other than every­one’s fa­vorite physi­cist Dr. Sheldon Cooper, the first thought for the role of the bul­lying fa­ther in my pro­jected movie was Brad Pitt, but any suit­ably ‘male’ actor would do…

 

 

 

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