dads and hollysiz let the light come through

Estimated reading time is 4 minutes.

AS A TARGET OF BULLIES most of my high school years, I have grown up as a reasonably ‘controlled’ adult (I have a veeeeeery long, veeeeeery slow-burning fuse to my once hair-trigger temper), constitutionally and philosophically anti-violence instigation (versus the necessity of using violence in defense), but quite capable of taking care of myself. (Of course, being a 200-pound 6-footer tends to dissuade most people from getting in my face.) 1

Nonetheless, due to the bullying, I have almost zero tolerance for bullies, wherever and whenever I see them. Upon hearing of the Columbine High School massacre in 1999, I did not immediately assume the shooters were bullies or that they were stoners or that they were victims of depression, or that they were hypnotized by backward-masked Satanic messages on their heavy metal albums.

No, upon hearing of the Columbine High School massacre I turned to Berni and said, “Wanna bet they were two loners who were bullied every day?”

Of course, she did not take the bet.

This brings me to a video that showed up as part of my daily email from Upworthy and addresses two things: human beings who grow up with someone on the inside who doesn’t look like the someone on the outside, and bullying. This video is titled “This kid’s dad is just as bad as the bullies at school until he makes me smile at the end.”

 

 

A film addressing transgender children

I was moved by the brief story and forwarded it to all my email contacts and I also posted it on my Facebook pages and those of family and friends. While showing it to Berni later in the day, a thought came to me: the producers of this four-minute video should pull it from distribution and find a writer to turn this into a ninety-minute movie. I can see this as an attention-getter, although not necessarily a blockbuster.

But as a film addressing the topics of transgender children, harassment and bullying in schools, and the need for the support of one’s parents against the bullying regardless of the reasons would grab not only the public’s attention but also that of the Academy Award voters.  2

 

HollySiz onstage 800

And just who is HollySiz?

So I decided to compose this brief piece on people who are not on the inside what everyone sees on the outside and dads and HollySiz. According to Wikipedia, Cécile Crochon, better known by the stage name Cécile Cassel, was born June 25, 1982. She is a French actress and singer. Since 2002, she has appeared in a number of films and television series. She is also a recording artist using the stage name HollySiz.

She is the half-sister of actor Vincent Cassel (to Americans, known for Oceans Twelve and Oceans Thirteen) and MC Mathias Cassel (better known as Rockin’ Squat), and the daughter of actor Jean-Pierre Cassel, who appeared in dozens of movies since the 1950s.

That’s it.

As a recording artist, she has had one hit in 2013 in France, the dumb but likable dance tune Come Back To Me. In the official video for the single, amidst the usual modern dance-plus-gymnastics (and that is not condescension) she incorporates some tap-dancing and some moves that appear to be a nod to Elvis Presley!

 

HollySiz_album

Her sole album, MY NAME IS, was also released in 2013 and was a modest best-seller in France. As an actress, she has appeared in more than a dozen French movies since 2010. Even her website provides little real information.

So her recording of The Light from her album was chosen to accompany the video on transgender people and bullies and it fit the theme of the video perfectly. Here are the lyrics:

Let the light come through us
Let’s believe in ourselves
Let’s believe in something

Let the light come through us
Let’s believe in ourselves
Let’s blow the dust on shelves

Let the shouts out locked up in our mouth
Let the shouts out locked up in our mouth

Let us go, let us grow
Let’s believe we can change
Let’s believe in ourselves

Let us go, let us grow
Let’s believe we can change
Let’s blow the dust on shelves

Let the shouts out locked up in our mouth
Let the shouts out locked up in our mouth

Let’s believe in our minds
Let’s believe in our minds
Let’s believe in our minds
Let’s believe we will let the shouts out locked up in our mouth
Let the shouts out locked up in our mouth . . .

Nice lyrics that nebulously address the need for each of us to see and recognize the light of truth, and to see and recognize the outrage within us, and to see and recognize the need for each of us to express that outrage together. For those readers who may find the one line confusing, read it this way: “Let the shouts out that are locked up in our mouth”

 


FOOTNOTES:

1   Notice that I said “a” target of bullies, not “the” target. That’s because while the victim of bullying feels very much alone when picked on, bullies rarely pick on just one kid or person. No, they are much more egalitarian, usually having several if not many targets. As Teddy Roosevelt might have said, “Bully for them!”

2   Despite the fact that the actor who plays the father in the video resembles none other than everyone’s favorite physicist Dr. Sheldon Cooper, the first thought for the role of the bullying father in my projected movie was Brad Pitt, but any suitably ‘male’ actor would do. . .

 

 

 

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