Beatles Rishikesh Ashram Sajish 2 1500 crop

sgt. pepper on blue jay way (beatles ’68 part 1)

THE BEATLES AS A GROUPas a rock & roll-based pop band—are an example of a gestalt, as the abilities and the accomplishments of the group far outstrip what could be expected of the four members knowing their individual skills and talents. This is not belittling their skills, which are many, but as their solo careers made too evident, each on his own wasn’t even close to what he had been as a Beatle. [Read more] “sgt. pepper on blue jay way (beatles ’68 part 1)”

Beatles Rishikesh Ashram Sajish 4 1500 crop

in search of the lost mentor (beatles ’68 part 2)

MAHARISHI MAHESH YOGI played an important role in the Beatles career, one that has been shoved aside by fans and historians. If you were of age and paying attention in 1968, the Maharishi was the Big Poobah in the Fab Four’s lives, at least for a while. [Read more] “in search of the lost mentor (beatles ’68 part 2)”

RichardHamilton JustWhatIsIt 1500 crop

how richard hamilton jazzed up the white album (beatles ’68 part 5)

ARTIST RICHARD HAMILTON was a fixture in the world of international art before the Beatles cut their first sides. For the 1956 exhibition called This Is Tomorrow, Richard Hamilton submitted a tiny (10 x 9-inch) collage titled “Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes so Different, so Appealing?” [Read more] “how richard hamilton jazzed up the white album (beatles ’68 part 5)”

BerlinWall 1961 construction 1500 crop

runaway with john and lew to the tell it like it was a-go-go

AS NOTED IN A PREVIOUS POST, I have been busy of late. With John Ross and Lew Shiner, I launched Tell It Like It Was, a music publication on Medium. Part of the publication is a list of every record to make it to #1 on the Cash Box Top 100 chart from the beginning of 1960 through the end of 1969. [Read more] “runaway with john and lew to the tell it like it was a-go-go”

JulieLondon 1956 close up 1500 crop

yummy yummy yummy julie london’s got love in her tummy

ANYTHING WITH “BEATLES” on it was hot property in the ’60s. Artists across the gamut of musical genres recorded Lennon-McCartney songs. This included the occasional country and folk artist and even jazz singers delved into the Fab Four’s songbook looking for hits. Few of these non-rock artists enjoyed any notable commercial success with these attempts. [Read more] “yummy yummy yummy julie london’s got love in her tummy”

Medium IMAGE jukebox Canva BrendanHumphreys d 1500

oldies radio is more diversified and more fun than classic rock radio

THIS TIME AROUND, the question on Quora was, “Why do I miss the oldies station on the radio and hate the stupid classic rock one when I like classic rock more?” My answer was brief and hopefully helpful (although a week later and there’s not a single upvote). [Read more] “oldies radio is more diversified and more fun than classic rock radio”

TommyJames HankyPanky GoldRecord b 1500

are today’s pop song lyrics getting more redundantly repetitive?

DOES YOUR BABY DO THE HANKY PANKY? The question asked on Quora was “Are Pop lyrics getting more and more repetitive?” Instead of a well-reasoned, thoughtful answer, I posted this instead (and my complete answer is between the two lines):

 

TommyJames HankyPanky Roulette 45 600

This is the Roulette Records version of Hanky Panky that was the #1 hit on Billboard and Cash Box and sold millions of copies in 1966. [Read more] “are today’s pop song lyrics getting more redundantly repetitive?”

AlKooper BloodSweatTears 1500

if you have an overture, do you also need an underture?

ON QUORA, it appears that most people ask a question hoping for an intelligent answer. The question is a genuine search for information. But it’s apparent that some people ask a question and then answer their own question. This seems to be a rhetorical device to impart information, to express an opinion, or to seek affirmation of an opinion. [Read more] “if you have an overture, do you also need an underture?”

NancySinatra white mini boots 1500

want to know one of the strangest records to top the charts?

FIFTY-TWO YEARS AGO, something unusual happened on the American popular music charts—which is an unusual statement because in the ’60s unusual things were happening in the world of rock and pop music on an almost daily basis! Back to the unusual something: on January 29, 1966, a record by an unknown artist debuted on the Cash Box Top 100 at #99. [Read more] “want to know one of the strangest records to top the charts?”