a complementary if brief surf raiders bio/overview

DO MOST YOUNG PEOPLE KNOW WHAT “SURF MUSIC” IS? That’s REAL surf music, the kind played by a guitar-and-rhythm-section-and-no-singer group! Many people—including non-record collecting older folk—think of the Beach Boys’ early harmonies when they hear the term “surf music,” but that was never considered surf music by surfer guys and gals (dudes and bunnies?). 1 Instrumental surf music was dominated by a heavily reverbed Fender guitar supported by a prominent bass line, one of the few pop music genres that placed emphasis on what was often just a part of the rhythm section. This music had its fifteen minutes… Continue Reading a complementary if brief surf raiders bio/overview

surfing guitars and instrumental surf bands of the early ’60s

ARGUING THE ‘BEST’ ROCK GUITAR PLAYERS of the ’60 is probably a pretty dumb way to waste time—and “Surfing Guitars” will not be doing that! Considerably more constructive and interesting would be an argument as to who were—and that’s intentionally plural—the most ‘creative’ players. Of course, to reach any kind of consensus there would require that we first agree on a definition of ‘creative’ in that context! For instance, Jimi Hendrix is often cited as rock’s most creative player, period. But was Jimi’s inventiveness in 1966-1967 (which includes both the ARE YOU EXPERIENCED? and AXIS: BOLD AS LOVE albums… Continue Reading surfing guitars and instrumental surf bands of the early ’60s

my review of outlaw blues for goodreads

WHILE I HAVE USED GOODREADS AS A SOURCE on my websites, I have not actually participated in the community of readers and reviewers. Until now: I just posted my first review for Paul Williams’s book Outlaw Blues for Goodreads. Oddly, it is only the second review of this important book (and the first was lukewarm). Here it is in its entirety: it’s brief because most reviews should be either enthusiastic teasers or venomous put-downs. Neither requires a lot of words . . . “Paul Williams’ Outlaw Blues collects articles, interviews, and reviews from Williams’ Crawdaddy magazine, where he was publisher, editor, and contributor.… Continue Reading my review of outlaw blues for goodreads

talking with ken barnes on his career as a rock journalist

A few weeks ago, I received an invitation from a young musician in England to make a connection on the LinkedIn site, the “world’s largest professional network.” Reluctantly I accepted it, despite the fact that I have yet to meet anyone who has actually benefited professionally from any of their LinkedIn connections. Nonetheless, I certainly don’t know everyone on that network, so maybe I was missing something. I corresponded briefly with this Englishman through LinkedIn before we actually connected in a more meaningful manner (read about it here). The meeting of him and me inspired me to return to LinkedIn,… Continue Reading talking with ken barnes on his career as a rock journalist

on paul williams, the father of rock journalism

IN 1980, I WAS LIVING IN ST. HELENA! I was 28-years old and living with the woman of my dreams—whose initials, BEM, will look familiar to every science fiction reader—in Napa Valley, California. I had a day job learning the care and maintenance of plants at Four Seasons Nursery, which I enjoyed, as plant people tend to be friendly people. I was also buying and selling out-of-print records, haunting the many used shops in the Bay Area (especially the thousands of records in the dollar bins at the back of Rasputin’s), and selling them through ads that I ran once a… Continue Reading on paul williams, the father of rock journalism