INTRODUCTION

MY FIRST “POST” was with the Wyoming Valley West High School newspaper, where I was the nerd who got the gig of reviewing records. That was 1969 and, like most nerds with super cool record collections, I wrote condescending reviews of records that all my non-nerd classmates bought. 1 I remember damning Glen Campbell (in the ’60s, teens actually bought Glen Campbell albums and were still cool) and dismissing Cream’s last album, GOODBYE. Then, everything changed. In 1970, I found Paul Williams’s book Outlaw Blues, a collection of his writings from Crawdaddy magazine. Williams didn’t write negative reviews—he wrote… Continue Reading INTRODUCTION

the day I uncovered “the secret of the universe” (and then forgot it)

I CAN SAFELY AND TRULY SAY that I knew it all—The Secret of the Universe. Once. Briefly. I can also say that this essay has little to do with record collecting, but it does touch on psychedelic music of the ’60s, so here it is (instead of on my other, eponymous blog). I wanted to provide this memory about doing acid for the first time in the Fall of 1970. No, wait . . . was it 1971? It’s all the same now, as there is no Past there is no Future there is only Now. Now, here’s what happened… Continue Reading the day I uncovered “the secret of the universe” (and then forgot it)

why aren’t the moody blues in the bloody rock & roll hall of fame?

IN A RECENT EDITION OF QUORA, someone asked why the Moody Blues haven’t been inducted into the bloody Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. It would certainly seem that the Moody Blues are far more qualified than many inductees, so I began preparing a lengthy answer, thinking I might provide some insight. But I got sidetracked with another project, and failed to get around to posting my comment. I revisited Quora to address the question and found a very intelligent response already made by Brett Pasternack: “What it comes down to is that the nominating committee has very specific… Continue Reading why aren’t the moody blues in the bloody rock & roll hall of fame?

a requiem for those timeless good good good vibrations

THE MAJOR RECORD COMPANIES usually released new titles on Monday, or at least they did in the ’60s. On April 12, 1965, I rushed home from school and ran upstairs to my room and tossed my books on my bed and pulled my money out of my drawer and ran downstairs to the garage and picked up my bike and zoomed off to Joe Nardone’s Record Shop and bought “Mr. Tambourine Man” by the Byrds and all was good good good that Monday! I was one of the first customers to grab a copy as Howard put the shipment up… Continue Reading a requiem for those timeless good good good vibrations

OOPS! My apologies if you have found your way here: I accidentally pressed the Publish button while working on this article before its completion. The final article will probably be in several parts, focusing on the alleged banning of certain records by Top 40 radio stations in the ’60s. Should take a few days for Part 1 to be completed . . .                   

the avid collector’s guide to wild in the streets part 3

THE AVID COLLECTOR’S GUIDE to Wild In The Streets Part 3 addresses records made that are associated with this movie—both singles and albums. All were released in the wake of the very successful movie in 1968, but few were hits. Before commencing, I recommend that you first read “On Wild In The Streets As Political And Social Satire” and then the first part of this four-part series of articles about the movie and its music. The movie Wild In The Streets was released to American theaters on May 29, 1968. Since people who have just seen a movie are more likely to purchase the… Continue Reading the avid collector’s guide to wild in the streets part 3